Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy OK with game’s physical nature — up to a point

Author : LavadaCrooks
Publish Date : 2021-04-20 05:41:25
Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy OK with game’s physical nature — up to a point

© Matthew J Lee/Globe staff After Garnet Hathaway slammed Jarred Tinordi from behind into the boards, Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy (above) argued for a stiff penalty against Hathaway.

Capitals winger Tom Wilson’s history of devastating — and questionable — hits has earned him a reputation around the NHL. But he brushed off a hit on a defenseless Sean Kuraly during the Bruins’ 6-3 win Sunday as a non-issue.

“Are we serious?” Wilson said. “I’m not even going to talk about it. It’s a nothing play. He’s fine. That’s it.”

Wilson has a recent history with the Bruins, earning a seven-game suspension last month for a hit on Brandon Carlo that left the defenseman with a concussion.

After Sunday’s win, Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy called the hit on Kuraly “incidental.” And with more time to think about it as the Bruins prepared to travel to Buffalo for three games, Cassidy still gave Wilson the benefit of the doubt despite his track record.

Cassidy said Wilson’s hit on Kuraly was different from the one on Carlo. While Carlo was against the boards, Kuraly was in the middle of the ice, fighting with two Capitals for the puck. Wilson already had Kuraly in his crosshairs when Kuraly started to tumble. Wilson caught Kuraly with an elbow to the head. While Kuraly was crumpled on the ice, a scuffle broke out between the teams.

“When a guy’s been suspended a number of times, he certainly looks for it,” Cassidy said. “I think you’ve always got to look at each situation. I think the Carlo one, a player yesterday is against the board, there’s nowhere for him to go. And I think the contact was high.

“I still say that he can argue it and that’s his right. I felt it was high and unnecessary to hit a player that high when you could have went right through his chest and accomplish the same thing, which was you know, separate him from the puck.

“So I think this one with Kuraly, honestly, Kuraly started to fall. So that’s tough on the opposition. If he had been straight up and [Wilson] targets the head, obviously, there you go. That’s unacceptable, especially in today’s game.

“But I think when Kuraly started to fall — and he looked like he tried to keep his elbow in — I don’t know if you can fault the player, especially when he’s 6-3 or 6-4 or whatever he is, so that’s when I’m OK with [it].”

Wilson’s hit sent Kuraly to the training room, but he later returned. The hit raised eyebrows, but the most dangerous checking incident came in the third period when Garnet Hathaway slammed Bruins defenseman Jarred Tinordi from behind and sent him into the boards face-first, leaving Tinordi’s face bloodied. Hathaway drew a five-minute major for boarding and game misconduct.

Cassidy said Tinordi was “feeling good” when they spoke at Monday’s practice.

Overall, Cassidy said, there’s a place in the game for hard hits, but there’s a line that has to be respected.

“It’s the ones along the boards, they have nowhere to go and then your head hits the glass, right?” Cassidy said. “To me, that’s a different animal. Or from behind.

“But the other one, I was OK with it. [The] argument is fair to that here’s a guy that’s involved in a lot of these, but that’s the way he plays and those are the ones to me that are OK.

Addition of Taylor Hall has given David Krejci a jump in production

“You don’t want your player on the receiving end of that. There has to be awareness when he’s on the ice, but there also should be hitting in hockey. There’s a time and a place for it. And I think that area of the ice to me, as long as it’s not in the head, is fair game.”

Sabres’ youth movement

In last place in the East Division at 12-26-7, the Sabres may not seem like a threat. But being out of the playoff hunt doesn’t make them any less dangerous to Cassidy. They’ve won three of their last five, upsetting the Flyers, Capitals, and Penguins, with interim head coach Don Granato pumping some confidence into a young team.

“I think what they’ve done well now is they’re just sort of putting guys in that maybe were fighting for ice time, now just letting them play,” Cassidy said. “I’m not going to say there’s no accountability, but there’s not a lot on the line. They’ve been eliminated from the playoffs, so they’re basically playing to get better, learn Donny Granato’s style, and then carry that forward to next year.”

In need of a veteran and a proven scorer, the Bruins made a deal with the Sabres at the trade deadline, acquiring forwards Taylor Hall and Curtis Lazar in a move that’s reaped instant rewards. But for Buffalo, Cassidy said, the deal may have given younger players like 22-year-old forward Casey Mittelstadt room to take on a larger role, in the locker room and on the ice.

“Maybe that allows some of the younger guys to be a little more vocal and grow into more of a responsible role in the room,” Cassidy said. “I don’t know, I’m not in there, but that’s typically what happens when some of the older guys leave. So now all of a sudden, you got a Mittlestadt that maybe wasn’t getting the minutes who’s obviously benefited the most, it looks like.”

Barrier breaker

For the fourth year, the NHL will honor a person who has positively impacted his or her community, culture, or society through hockey with its Willie O’Ree Community Hero Award, named after the former Bruin who broke barriers as the NHL’s first Black player.

Nominations opened at the beginning of the month and will be accepted up to the April 25 deadline. Fans, community leaders, NHL teams, and minor hockey associations can nominate a candidate.

Bruins netminder future seems promising with Jeremy Swayman in waiting

The winner will receive a $25,000 prize while two finalists will receive $5,000 each.

Decision due on Grzelcyk

Matt Grzelcyk skated Monday morning and could return to action Tuesday. Cassidy said a decision would be made after the morning skate … Goaltender Jaroslav© Matthew J Lee/Globe staff After Garnet Hathaway slammed Jarred Tinordi from behind into the boards, Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy (above) argued for a stiff penalty against Hathaway.

Capitals winger Tom Wilson’s history of devastating — and questionable — hits has earned him a reputation around the NHL. But he brushed off a hit on a defenseless Sean Kuraly during the Bruins’ 6-3 win Sunday as a non-issue.

“Are we serious?” Wilson said. “I’m not even going to talk about it. It’s a nothing play. He’s fine. That’s it.”

Wilson has a recent history with the Bruins, earning a seven-game suspension last month for a hit on Brandon Carlo that left the defenseman with a concussion.

After Sunday’s win, Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy called the hit on Kuraly “incidental.” And with more time to think about it as the Bruins prepared to travel to Buffalo for three games, Cassidy still gave Wilson the benefit of the doubt despite his track record.

Cassidy said Wilson’s hit on Kuraly was different from the one on Carlo. While Carlo was against the boards, Kuraly was in the middle of the ice, fighting with two Capitals for the puck. Wilson already had Kuraly in his crosshairs when Kuraly started to tumble. Wilson caught Kuraly with an elbow to the head. While Kuraly was crumpled on the ice, a scuffle broke out between the teams.

“When a guy’s been suspended a number of times, he certainly looks for it,” Cassidy said. “I think you’ve always got to look at each situation. I think the Carlo one, a player yesterday is against the board, there’s nowhere for him to go. And I think the contact was high.

“I still say that he can argue it and that’s his right. I felt it was high and unnecessary to hit a player that high when you could have went right through his chest and accomplish the same thing, which was you know, separate him from the puck.

“So I think this one with Kuraly, honestly, Kuraly started to fall. So that’s tough on the opposition. If he had been straight up and [Wilson] targets the head, obviously, there you go. That’s unacceptable, especially in today’s game.

“But I think when Kuraly started to fall — and he looked like he tried to keep his elbow in — I don’t know if you can fault the player, especially when he’s 6-3 or 6-4 or whatever he is, so that’s when I’m OK with [it].”

Wilson’s hit sent Kuraly to the training room, but he later returned. The hit raised eyebrows, but the most dangerous checking incident came in the third period when Garnet Hathaway slammed Bruins defenseman Jarred Tinordi from behind and sent him into the boards face-first, leaving Tinordi’s face bloodied. Hathaway drew a five-minute major for boarding and game misconduct.

Cassidy said Tinordi was “feeling good” when they spoke at Monday’s practice.

Overall, Cassidy said, there’s a place in the game for hard hits, but there’s a line that has to be respected.

“It’s the ones along the boards, they have nowhere to go and then your head hits the glass, right?” Cassidy said. “To me, that’s a different animal. Or from behind.

“But the other one, I was OK with it. [The] argument is fair to that here’s a guy that’s involved in a lot of these, but that’s the way he plays and those are the ones to me that are OK.

Addition of Taylor Hall has given David Krejci a jump in production

“You don’t want your player on the receiving end of that. There has to be awareness when he’s on the ice, but there also should be hitting in hockey. There’s a time and a place for it. And I think that area of the ice to me, as long as it’s not in the head, is fair game.”

Sabres’ youth movement

In last place in the East Division at 12-26-7, the Sabres may not seem like a threat. But being out of the playoff hunt doesn’t make them any less dangerous to Cassidy. They’ve won three of their last five, upsetting the Flyers, Capitals, and Penguins, with interim head coach Don Granato pumping some confidence into a young team.

“I think what they’ve done well now is they’re just sort of putting guys in that maybe were fighting for ice time, now just letting them play,” Cassidy said. “I’m not going to say there’s no accountability, but there’s not a lot on the line. They’ve been eliminated from the playoffs, so they’re basically playing to get better, learn Donny Granato’s style, and then carry that forward to next year.”

In need of a veteran and a proven scorer, the Bruins made a deal with the Sabres at the trade deadline, acquiring forwards Taylor Hall and Curtis Lazar in a move that’s reaped instant rewards. But for Buffalo, Cassidy said, the deal may have given younger players like 22-year-old forward Casey Mittelstadt room to take on a larger role, in the locker room and on the ice.

“Maybe that allows some of the younger guys to be a little more vocal and grow into more of a responsible role in the room,” Cassidy said. “I don’t know, I’m not in there, but that’s typically what happens when some of the older guys leave. So now all of a sudden, you got a Mittlestadt that maybe wasn’t getting the minutes who’s obviously benefited the most, it looks like.”

Barrier breaker

For the fourth year, the NHL will honor a person who has positively impacted his or her community, culture, or society through hockey with its Willie O’Ree Community Hero Award, named after the former Bruin who broke barriers as the NHL’s first Black player.

Nominations opened at the beginning of the month and will be accepted up to the April 25 deadline. Fans, community leaders, NHL teams, and minor hockey associations can nominate a candidate.

Bruins netminder future seems promising with Jeremy Swayman in waiting

The winner will receive a $25,000 prize while two finalists will receive $5,000 each.

Decision due on Grzelcyk

Matt Grzelcyk skated Monday morning and could return to action Tuesday. Cassidy said a decision would be made after the morning skate … Goaltender Jar© Matthew J Lee/Globe staff After Garnet Hathaway slammed Jarred Tinordi from behind into the boards, Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy (above) argued for a stiff penalty against Hathaway.

Capitals winger Tom Wilson’s history of devastating — and questionable — hits has earned him a reputation around the NHL. But he brushed off a hit on a defenseless Sean Kuraly during the Bruins’ 6-3 win Sunday as a non-issue.

“Are we serious?” Wilson said. “I’m not even going to talk about it. It’s a nothing play. He’s fine. That’s it.”

Wilson has a recent history with the Bruins, earning a seven-game suspension last month for a hit on Brandon Carlo that left the defenseman with a concussion.

After Sunday’s win, Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy called the hit on Kuraly “incidental.” And with more time to think about it as the Bruins prepared to travel to Buffalo for three games, Cassidy still gave Wilson the benefit of the doubt despite his track record.

Cassidy said Wilson’s hit on Kuraly was different from the one on Carlo. While Carlo was against the boards, Kuraly was in the middle of the ice, fighting with two Capitals for the puck. Wilson already had Kuraly in his crosshairs when Kuraly started to tumble. Wilson caught Kuraly with an elbow to the head. While Kuraly was crumpled on the ice, a scuffle broke out between the teams.

“When a guy’s been suspended a number of times, he certainly looks for it,” Cassidy said. “I think you’ve always got to look at each situation. I think the Carlo one, a player yesterday is against the board, there’s nowhere for him to go. And I think the contact was high.

“I still say that he can argue it and that’s his right. I felt it was high and unnecessary to hit a player that high when you could have went right through his chest and accomplish the same thing, which was you know, separate him from the puck.

“So I think this one with Kuraly, honestly, Kuraly started to fall. So that’s tough on the opposition. If he had been straight up and [Wilson] targets the head, obviously, there you go. That’s unacceptable, especially in today’s game.

“But I think when Kuraly started to fall — and he looked like he tried to keep his elbow in — I don’t know if you can fault the player, especially when he’s 6-3 or 6-4 or whatever he is, so that’s when I’m OK with [it].”

Wilson’s hit sent Kuraly to the training room, but he later returned. The hit raised eyebrows, but the most dangerous checking incident came in the third period when Garnet Hathaway slammed Bruins defenseman Jarred Tinordi from behind and sent him into the boards face-first, leaving Tinordi’s face bloodied. Hathaway drew a five-minute major for boarding and game misconduct.

Cassidy said Tinordi was “feeling good” when they spoke at Monday’s practice.

Overall, Cassidy said, there’s a place in the game for hard hits, but there’s a line that has to be respected.

“It’s the ones along the boards, they have nowhere to go and then your head hits the glass, right?” Cassidy said. “To me, that’s a different animal. Or from behind.

“But the other one, I was OK with it. [The] argument is fair to that here’s a guy that’s involved in a lot of these, but that’s the way he plays and those are the ones to me that are OK.

Addition of Taylor Hall has given David Krejci a jump in production

“You don’t want your player on the receiving end of that. There has to be awareness when he’s on the ice, but there also should be hitting in hockey. There’s a time and a place for it. And I think that area of the ice to me, as long as it’s not in the head, is fair game.”

Sabres’ youth movement

In last place in the East Division at 12-26-7, the Sabres may not seem like a threat. But being out of the playoff hunt doesn’t make them any less dangerous to Cassidy. They’ve won three of their last five, upsetting the Flyers, Capitals, and Penguins, with interim head coach Don Granato pumping some confidence into a young team.

“I think what they’ve done well now is they’re just sort of putting guys in that maybe were fighting for ice time, now just letting them play,” Cassidy said. “I’m not going to say there’s no accountability, but there’s not a lot on the line. They’ve been eliminated from the playoffs, so they’re basically playing to get better, learn Donny Granato’s style, and then carry that forward to next year.”

In need of a veteran and a proven scorer, the Bruins made a deal with the Sabres at the trade deadline, acquiring forwards Taylor Hall and Curtis Lazar in a move that’s reaped instant rewards. But for Buffalo, Cassidy said, the deal may have given younger players like 22-year-old forward Casey Mittelstadt room to take on a larger role, in the locker room and on the ice.

“Maybe that allows some of the younger guys to be a little more vocal and grow into more of a responsible role in the room,” Cassidy said. “I don’t know, I’m not in there, but that’s typically what happens when some of the older guys leave. So now all of a sudden, you got a Mittlestadt that maybe wasn’t getting the minutes who’s obviously benefited the most, it looks like.”

Barrier breaker

For the fourth year, the NHL will honor a person who has positively impacted his or her community, culture, or society through hockey with its Willie O’Ree Community Hero Award, named after the former Bruin who broke barriers as the NHL’s first Black player.

Nominations opened at the beginning of the month and will be accepted up to the April 25 deadline. Fans, community leaders, NHL teams, and minor hockey associations can nominate a candidate.

Bruins netminder future seems promising with Jeremy Swayman in waiting

The winner will receive a $25,000 prize while two finalists will receive $5,000 each.

Decision due on Grzelcyk

Matt Grzelcyk skated Monday morning and could return to action Tuesday. Cassidy said a decision would be made after the morning skate … Goaltender Jaroslav Halak was on the ice with the taxi squad and will travel with the team to Buffalo. He’s working on conditioning after spending the p© Matthew J Lee/Globe staff After Garnet Hathaway slammed Jarred Tinordi from behind into the boards, Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy (above) argued for a stiff penalty against Hathaway.

Capitals winger Tom Wilson’s history of devastating — and questionable — hits has earned him a reputation around the NHL. But he brushed off a hit on a defenseless Sean Kuraly during the Bruins’ 6-3 win Sunday as a non-issue.

“Are we serious?” Wilson said. “I’m not even going to talk about it. It’s a nothing play. He’s fine. That’s it.”

Wilson has a recent history with the Bruins, earning a seven-game suspension last month for a hit on Brandon Carlo that left the defenseman with a concussion.

After Sunday’s win, Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy called the hit on Kuraly “incidental.” And with more time to think about it as the Bruins prepared to travel to Buffalo for three games, Cassidy still gave Wilson the benefit of the doubt despite his track record.

Cassidy said Wilson’s hit on Kuraly was different from the one on Carlo. While Carlo was against the boards, Kuraly was in the middle of the ice, fighting with two Capitals for the puck. Wilson already had Kuraly in his crosshairs when Kuraly started to tumble. Wilson caught Kuraly with an elbow to the head. While Kuraly was crumpled on the ice, a scuffle broke out between the teams.

“When a guy’s been suspended a number of times, he certainly looks for it,” Cassidy said. “I think you’ve always got to look at each situation. I think the Carlo one, a player yesterday is against the board, there’s nowhere for him to go. And I think the contact was high.

“I still say that he can argue it and that’s his right. I felt it was high and unnecessary to hit a player that high when you could have went right through his chest and accomplish the same thing, which was you know, separate him from the puck.

“So I think this one with Kuraly, honestly, Kuraly started to fall. So that’s tough on the opposition. If he had been straight up and [Wilson] targets the head, obviously, there you go. That’s unacceptable, especially in today’s game.

“But I think when Kuraly started to fall — and he looked like he tried to keep his elbow in — I don’t know if you can fault the player, especially when he’s 6-3 or 6-4 or whatever he is, so that’s when I’m OK with [it].”

Wilson’s hit sent Kuraly to the training room, but he later returned. The hit raised eyebrows, but the most dangerous checking incident came in the third period when Garnet Hathaway slammed Bruins defenseman Jarred Tinordi from behind and sent him into the boards face-first, leaving Tinordi’s face bloodied. Hathaway drew a five-minute major for boarding and game misconduct.

Cassidy said Tinordi was “feeling good” when they spoke at Monday’s practice.

Overall, Cassidy said, there’s a place in the game for hard hits, but there’s a line that has to be respected.

“It’s the ones along the boards, they have nowhere to go and then your head hits the glass, right?” Cassidy said. “To me, that’s a different animal. Or from behind.

“But the other one, I was OK with it. [The] argument is fair to that here’s a guy that’s involved in a lot of these, but that’s the way he plays and those are the ones to me that are OK.

Addition of Taylor Hall has given David Krejci a jump in production

“You don’t want your player on the receiving end of that. There has to be awareness when he’s on the ice, but there also should be hitting in hockey. There’s a time and a place for it. And I think that area of the ice to me, as long as it’s not in the head, is fair game.”

Sabres’ youth movement

In last place in the East Division at 12-26-7, the Sabres may not seem like a threat. But being out of the playoff hunt doesn’t make them any less dangerous to Cassidy. They’ve won three of their last five, upsetting the Flyers, Capitals, and Penguins, with interim head coach Don Granato pumping some confidence into a young team.

“I think what they’ve done well now is they’re just sort of putting guys in that maybe were fighting for ice time, now just letting them play,” Cassidy said. “I’m not going to say there’s no accountability, but there’s not a lot on the line. They’ve been eliminated from the playoffs, so they’re basically playing to get better, learn Donny Granato’s style, and then carry that forward to next year.”

In need of a veteran and a proven scorer, the Bruins made a deal with the Sabres at the trade deadline, acquiring forwards Taylor Hall and Curtis Lazar in a move that’s reaped instant rewards. But for Buffalo, Cassidy said, the deal may have given younger players like 22-year-old forward Casey Mittelstadt room to take on a larger role, in the locker room and on the ice.

“Maybe that allows some of the younger guys to be a little more vocal and grow into more of a responsible role in the room,” Cassidy said. “I don’t know, I’m not in there, but that’s typically what happens when some of the older guys leave. So now all of a sudden, you got a Mittlestadt that maybe wasn’t getting the minutes who’s obviously benefited the most, it looks like.”

Barrier breaker

For the fourth year, the NHL will honor a person who has positively impacted his or her community, culture, or society through hockey with its Willie O’Ree Community Hero Award, named after the former Bruin who broke barriers as the NHL’s first Black player.

Nominations opened at the beginning of the month and will be accepted up to the April 25 deadline. Fans, community leaders, NHL teams, and minor hockey associations can nominate a candidate.

Bruins netminder future seems promising with Jeremy Swayman in waiting

The winner will receive a $25,000 prize while two finalists will receive $5,000 each.

Decision due on Grzelcyk

Matt Grzelcyk skated Monday morning and could return to action Tuesday. Cassidy said a decision would be made after the morning skate … Goaltender Jaroslav Halak was on the ice with the taxi squad and will travel with the team to Buffalo. He’s working on conditioning after spending the p

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ast two weeks on the COVID-19 protocols list … Jakub Zboril skated and should be available Tuesday … Defenseman Kevan Miller will travel with the team to Buffalo and could play later in the week, while Carlo and Ondrej Case will not be among the travel party.

ast two weeks on the COVID-19 protocols list … Jakub Zboril skated and should be available Tuesday … Defenseman Kevan Miller will travel with the team to Buffalo and could play later in the week, while Carlo and Ondrej Case will not be among the travel party.

oslav Halak was on the ice with the taxi squad and will travel with the team to Buffalo. He’s working on conditioning after spending the past two weeks on the COVID-19 protocols list … Jakub Zboril skated and should be available Tuesday … Defenseman Kevan Miller will travel with the team to Buffalo and could play later in the week, while Carlo and Ondrej Case will not be among the travel party.

Halak was on the ice with the taxi squad and will travel with the team to Buffalo. He’s working on conditioning after spending the past two weeks on the COVID-19 protocols list … Jakub Zboril skated and should be available Tuesday … Defenseman Kevan Miller will travel with the team to Buffalo and could play later in the week, while Carlo and Ondrej Case will not be among the travel party.



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