Can an African Nation Win the FIFA World Cup?

Author : jihnymesaay
Publish Date : 2021-04-20 06:36:28
Can an African Nation Win the FIFA World Cup?

Ever since Sepp Blatter announced his desire to bring the World Cup finals to Africa, the FIFA President has also, on numerous occasions, stated his belief that an African nation has the ability to become world champions in football one day. Blatter has since realised his dream to stage the finals in an African country (South Africa 2010), but before then, there has been no representative from the continent in the final of previous editions.

There has been no shortage of contenders. For example, Nigeria has often been considered the strongest team in African football. However, they have yet to go as far as the final in any past World Cups. Ghana and Ivory Coast are also touted as countries that will challenge the established order in world football, yet the proof is in the pudding and they have not proven anything so far.

So will there ever be a World Cup winner that is part of the African continent? We can only look as far as the next World Cup finals and assess each of the contenders that have qualified for the chance. From there, it might perhaps be possible to find out if the global footballing community can celebrate the ultimate rise of the sport in Africa.

Nigeria carries huge expectations on their shoulders every time they play. They are often regarded as the Brazil of Africa - playing the most sublime soccer on the continent and exporting some of the world's best footballers. It is also these qualities that raise expectations unrealistically high and the team often shows the strain of having to deal with that burden in various tournament. Too often they have flattered to deceive in previous World Cup finals and African Cup of Nations - the equivalent of the World Cup but played exclusively amongst the continent's countries. The Super Eagles are also often torn apart by internal disputes over money, disciplinary issues and an ever changing management that has disrupted many a preparation. Fans are not hoping for much this time and compared to previous squads, the Nigeria of 2010 do not quite spark everyone's imagination.

Algeria has made two previous trips to the World Cup finals and have overall made a positive impression. Known for mixing clever play with gutsy determination, the Algerians are your typical underdogs that can spring an upset when least expected, while stumbling when expectations are raised. It was again evident on their path to South Africa 2010 when they actually dumped African champions Egypt out of the qualifiers in stunning fashion. Yet, they failed horribly in the recent African Cup of Nations finals and have already been written off by most critics.

Ever since Sepp Blatter announced his desire to bring the World Cup finals to Africa, the FIFA President has also, on numerous occasions, stated his belief that an African nation has the ability to become world champions in football one day. Blatter has since realised his dream to stage the finals in an African country (South Africa 2010), but before then, there has been no representative from the continent in the final of previous editions.

There has been no shortage of contenders. For example, Nigeria has often been considered the strongest team in African football. However, they have yet to go as far as the final in any past World Cups. Ghana and Ivory Coast are also touted as countries that will challenge the established order in world football, yet the proof is in the pudding and they have not proven anything so far.

So will there ever be a World Cup winner that is part of the African continent? We can only look as far as the next World Cup finals and assess each of the contenders that have qualified for the chance. From there, it might perhaps be possible to find out if the global footballing community can celebrate the ultimate rise of the sport in Africa.

Nigeria carries huge expectations on their shoulders every time they play. They are often regarded as the Brazil of Africa - playing the most sublime soccer on the continent and exporting some of the world's best footballers. It is also these qualities that raise expectations unrealistically high and the team often shows the strain of having to deal with that burden in various tournament. Too often they have flattered to deceive in previous World Cup finals and African Cup of Nations - the equivalent of the World Cup but played exclusively amongst the continent's countries. The Super Eagles are also often torn apart by internal disputes over money, disciplinary issues and an ever changing management that has disrupted many a preparation. Fans are not hoping for much this time and compared to previous squads, the Nigeria of 2010 do not quite spark everyone's imagination.

Algeria has made two previous trips to the World Cup finals and have overall made a positive impression. Known for mixing clever play with gutsy determination, the Algerians are your typical underdogs that can spring an upset when least expected, while stumbling when expectations are raised. It was again evident on their path to South Africa 2010 when they actually dumped African champions Egypt out of the qualifiers in stunning fashion. Yet, they failed horribly in the recent African Cup of Nations finals and have already been written off by most critics.

Ever since Sepp Blatter announced his desire to bring the World Cup finals to Africa, the FIFA President has also, on numerous occasions, stated his belief that an African nation has the ability to become world champions in football one day. Blatter has since realised his dream to stage the finals in an African country (South Africa 2010), but before then, there has been no representative from the continent in the final of previous editions.

There has been no shortage of contenders. For example, Nigeria has often been considered the strongest team in African football. However, they have yet to go as far as the final in any past World Cups. Ghana and Ivory Coast are also touted as countries that will challenge the established order in world football, yet the proof is in the pudding and they have not proven anything so far.

So will there ever be a World Cup winner that is part of the African continent? We can only look as far as the next World Cup finals and assess each of the contenders that have qualified for the chance. From there, it might perhaps be possible to find out if the global footballing community can celebrate the ultimate rise of the sport in Africa.

Nigeria carries huge expectations on their shoulders every time they play. They are often regarded as the Brazil of Africa - playing the most sublime soccer on the continent and exporting some of the world's best footballers. It is also these qualities that raise expectations unrealistically high and the team often shows the strain of having to deal with that burden in various tournament. Too often they have flattered to deceive in previous World Cup finals and African Cup of Nations - the equivalent of the World Cup but played exclusively amongst the continent's countries. The Super Eagles are also often torn apart by internal disputes over money, disciplinary issues and an ever changing management that has disrupted many a preparation. Fans are not hoping for much this time and compared to previous squads, the Nigeria of 2010 do not quite spark everyone's imagination.

Algeria has made two previous trips to the World Cup finals and have overall made a positive impression. Known for mixing clever play with gutsy determination, the Algerians are your typical underdogs that can spring an upset when least expected, while stumbling when expectations are raised. It was again evident on their path to South Africa 2010 when they actually dumped African champions Egypt out of the qualifiers in stunning fashion. Yet, they failed horribly in the recent African Cup of Nations finals and have already been written off by most critics.

Ever since Sepp Blatter announced his desire to bring the World Cup finals to Africa, the FIFA President has also, on numerous occasions, stated his belief that an African nation has the ability to become world champions in football one day. Blatter has since realised his dream to stage the finals in an African country (South Africa 2010), but before then, there has been no representative from the continent in the final of previous editions.

There has been no shortage of contenders. For example, Nigeria has often been considered the strongest team in African football. However, they have yet to go as far as the final in any past World Cups. Ghana and Ivory Coast are also touted as countries that will challenge the established order in world football, yet the proof is in the pudding and they have not proven anything so far.

So will there ever be a World Cup winner that is part of the African continent? We can only look as far as the next World Cup finals and assess each of the contenders that have qualified for the chance. From there, it might perhaps be possible to find out if the global footballing community can celebrate the ultimate rise of the sport in Africa.

Nigeria carries huge expectations on their shoulders every time they play. They are often regarded as the Brazil of Africa - playing the most sublime soccer on the continent and exporting some of the world's best footballers. It is also these qualities that raise expectations unrealistically high and the team often shows the strain of having to deal with that burden in various tournament. Too often they have flattered to deceive in previous World Cup finals and African Cup of Nations - the equivalent of the World Cup but played exclusively amongst the continent's countries. The Super Eagles are also often torn apart by internal disputes over money, disciplinary issues and an ever changing management that has disrupted many a preparation. Fans are not hoping for much this time and compared to previous squads, the Nigeria of 2010 do not quite spark everyone's imagination.

Algeria has made two previous trips to the World Cup finals and have overall made a positive impression. Known for mixing clever play with gutsy determination, the Algerians are your typical underdogs that can spring an upset when least expected, while stumbling when expectations are raised. It was again evident on their path to South Africa 2010 when they actually dumped African champions Egypt out of the qualifiers in stunning fashion. Yet, they failed horribly in the recent African Cup of Nations finals and have already been written off by most critics.

Ever since Sepp Blatter announced his desire to bring the World Cup finals to Africa, the FIFA President has also, on numerous occasions, stated his belief that an African nation has the ability to become world champions in football one day. Blatter has since realised his dream to stage the finals in an African country (South Africa 2010), but before then, there has been no representative from the continent in the final of previous editions.

There has been no shortage of contenders. For example, Nigeria has often been considered the strongest team in African football. However, they have yet to go as far as the final in any past World Cups. Ghana and Ivory Coast are also touted as countries that will challenge the established order in world football, yet the proof is in the pudding and they have not proven anything so far.

So will there ever be a World Cup winner that is part of the African continent? We can only look as far as the next World Cup finals and assess each of the contenders that have qualified for the chance. From there, it might perhaps be possible to find out if the global footballing community can celebrate the ultimate rise of the sport in Africa.

Nigeria carries huge expectations on their shoulders every time they play. They are often regarded as the Brazil of Africa - playing the most sublime soccer on the continent and exporting some of the world's best footballers. It is also these qualities that raise expectations unrealistically high and the team often shows the strain of having to deal with that burden in various tournament. Too often they have flattered to deceive in previous World Cup finals and African Cup of Nations - the equivalent of the World Cup but played exclusively amongst the continent's countries. The Super Eagles are also often torn apart by internal disputes over money, disciplinary issues and an ever changing management that has disrupted many a preparation. Fans are not hoping for much this time and compared to previous squads, the Nigeria of 2010 do not quite spark everyone's imagination.

Algeria has made two previous trips to the World Cup finals and have overall made a positive impression. Known for mixing clever play with gutsy determination, the Algerians are your typical underdogs that can spring an upset when least expected, while stumbling when expectations are raised. It was again evident on their path to South Africa 2010 when they actually dumped African champions Egypt out of the qualifiers in stunning fashion. Yet, they failed horribly in the recent African Cup of Nations finals and have already been written off by most critics.

Ever since Sepp Blatter announced his desire to bring the World Cup finals to Africa, the FIFA President has also, on numerous occasions, stated his belief that an African nation has the ability to become world champions in football one day. Blatter has since realised his dream to stage the finals in an African country (South Africa 2010), but before then, there has been no representative from the continent in the final of previous editions.

There has been no shortage of contenders. For example, Nigeria has often been considered the strongest team in African football. However, they have yet to go as far as the final in any past World Cups. Ghana and Ivory Coast are also touted as countries that will challenge the established order in world football, yet the proof is in the pudding and they have not proven anything so far.

So will there ever be a World Cup winner that is part of the African continent? We can only look as far as the next World Cup finals and assess each of the contenders that have qualified for the chance. From there, it might perhaps be possible to find out if the global footballing community can celebrate the ultimate rise of the sport in Africa.

Nigeria carries huge expectations on their shoulders every time they play. They are often regarded as the Brazil of Africa - playing the most sublime soccer on the continent and exporting some of the world's best footballers. It is also these qualities that raise expectations unrealistically high and the team often shows the strain of having to deal with that burden in various tournament. Too often they have flattered to deceive in previous World Cup finals and African Cup of Nations - the equivalent of the World Cup but played exclusively amongst the continent's countries. The Super Eagles are also often torn apart by internal disputes over money, disciplinary issues and an ever changing management that has disrupted many a preparation. Fans are not hoping for much this time and compared to previous squads, the Nigeria of 2010 do not quite spark everyone's imagination.

Algeria has made two previous trips to the World Cup finals and have overall made a positive impression. Known for mixing clever play with gutsy determination, the Algerians are your typical underdogs that can spring an upset when least expected, while stumbling when expectations are raised. It was again evident on their path to South Africa 2010 when they actually dumped African champions Egypt out of the qualifiers in stunning fashion. Yet, they failed horribly in the recent African Cup of Nations finals and have already been written off by most critics.

Ever since Sepp Blatter announced his desire to bring the World Cup finals to Africa, the FIFA President has also, on numerous occasions, stated his belief that an African nation has the ability to become world champions in football one day. Blatter has since realised his dream to stage the finals in an African country (South Africa 2010), but before then, there has been no representative from the continent in the final of previous editions.

There has been no shortage of contenders. For example, Nigeria has often been considered the strongest team in African football. However, they have yet to go as far as the final in any past World Cups. Ghana and Ivory Coast are also touted as countries that will challenge the established order in world football, yet the proof is in the pudding and they have not proven anything so far.

So will there ever be a World Cup winner that is part of the African continent? We can only look as far as the next World Cup finals and assess each of the contenders that have qualified for the chance. From there, it might perhaps be possible to find out if the global footballing community can celebrate the ultimate rise of the sport in Africa.

Nigeria carries huge expectations on their shoulders every time they play. They are often regarded as the Brazil of Africa - playing the most sublime soccer on the continent and exporting some of the world's best footballers. It is also these qualities that raise expectations unrealistically high and the team often shows the strain of having to deal with that burden in various tournament. Too often they have flattered to deceive in previous World Cup finals and African Cup of Nations - the equivalent of the World Cup but played exclusively amongst the continent's countries. The Super Eagles are also often torn apart by internal disputes over money, disciplinary issues and an ever changing management that has disrupted many a preparation. Fans are not hoping for much this time and compared to previous squads, the Nigeria of 2010 do not quite spark everyone's imagination.

Algeria has made two previous trips to the World Cup finals and have overall made a positive impression. Known for mixing clever play with gutsy determination, the Algerians are your typical underdogs that can spring an upset when least expected, while stumbling when expectations are raised. It was again evident on their path to South Africa 2010 when they actually dumped African champions Egypt out of the qualifiers in stunning fashion. Yet, they failed horribly in the recent African Cup of Nations finals and have already been written off by most critics.

Ever since Sepp Blatter announced his desire to bring the World Cup finals to Africa, the FIFA President has also, on numerous occasions, stated his belief that an African nation has the ability to become world champions in football one day. Blatter has since realised his dream to stage the finals in an African country (South Africa 2010), but before then, there has been no representative from the continent in the final of previous editions.

There has been no shortage of contenders. For example, Nigeria has often been considered the strongest team in African football. However, they have yet to go as far as the final in any past World Cups. Ghana and Ivory Coast are also touted as countries that will challenge the established order in world football, yet the proof is in the pudding and they have not proven anything so far.

So will there ever be a World Cup winner that is part of the African continent? We can only look as far as the next World Cup finals and assess each of the contenders that have qualified for the chance. From there, it might perhaps be possible to find out if the global footballing community can celebrate the ultimate rise of the sport in Africa.

Nigeria carries huge expectations on their shoulders every time they play. They are often regarded as the Brazil of Africa - playing the most sublime soccer on the continent and exporting some of the world's best footballers. It is also these qualities that raise expectations unrealistically high and the team often shows the strain of having to deal with that burden in various tournament. Too often they have flattered to deceive in previous World Cup finals and African Cup of Nations - the equivalent of the World Cup but played exclusively amongst the continent's countries. The Super Eagles are also often torn apart by internal disputes over money, disciplinary issues and an ever changing management that has disrupted many a preparation. Fans are not hoping for much this time and compared to previous squads, the Nigeria of 2010 do not quite spark everyone's imagination.

Algeria has made two previous trips to the World Cup finals and have overall made a positive impression. Known for mixing clever play with gutsy determination, the Algerians are your typical underdogs that can spring an upset when least expected, while stumbling when expectations are raised. It was again evident on their path to South Africa 2010 when they actually dumped African champions Egypt out of the qualifiers in stunning fashion. Yet, they failed horribly in the recent African Cup of Nations finals and have already been written off by most critics.

Ever since Sepp Blatter announced his desire to bring the World Cup finals to Africa, the FIFA President has also, on numerous occasions, stated his belief that an African nation has the ability to become world champions in football one day. Blatter has since realised his dream to stage the finals in an African country (South Africa 2010), but before then, there has been no representative from the continent in the final of previous editions.

There has been no shortage of contenders. For example, Nigeria has often been considered the strongest team in African football. However, they have yet to go as far as the final in any past World Cups. Ghana and Ivory Coast are also touted as countries that will challenge the established order in world football, yet the proof is in the pudding and they have not proven anything so far.

So will there ever be a World Cup winner that is part of the African continent? We can only look as far as the next World Cup finals and assess each of the contenders that have qualified for the chance. From there, it might perhaps be possible to find out if the global footballing community can celebrate the ultimate rise of the sport in Africa.

Nigeria carries huge expectations on their shoulders every time they play. They are often regarded as the Brazil of Africa - playing the most sublime soccer on the continent and exporting some of the world's best footballers. It is also these qualities that raise expectations unrealistically high and the team often shows the strain of having to deal with that burden in various tournament. Too often they have flattered to deceive in previous World Cup finals and African Cup of Nations - the equivalent of the World Cup but played exclusively amongst the continent's countries. The Super Eagles are also often torn apart by internal disputes over money, disciplinary issues and an ever changing management that has disrupted many a preparation. Fans are not hoping for much this time and compared to previous squads, the Nigeria of 2010 do not quite spark everyone's imagination.

Algeria has made two previous trips to the World Cup finals and have overall made a positive impression. Known for mixing clever play with gutsy determination, the Algerians are your typical underdogs that can spring an upset when least expected, while stumbling when expectations are raised. It was again evident on their path to South Africa 2010 when they actually dumped African champions Egypt out of the qualifiers in stunning fashion. Yet, they failed horribly in the recent African Cup of Nations finals and have already been written off by most critics.

Ever since Sepp Blatter announced his desire to bring the World Cup finals to Africa, the FIFA President has also, on numerous occasions, stated his belief that an African nation has the ability to become world champions in football one day. Blatter has since realised his dream to stage the finals in an African country (South Africa 2010), but before then, there has been no representative from the continent in the final of previous editions.

There has been no shortage of contenders. For example, Nigeria has often been considered the strongest team in African football. However, they have yet to go as far as the final in any past World Cups. Ghana and Ivory Coast are also touted as countries that will challenge the established order in world football, yet the proof is in the pudding and they have not proven anything so far.

So will there ever be a World Cup winner that is part of the African continent? We can only look as far as the next World Cup finals and assess each of the contenders that have qualified for the chance. From there, it might perhaps be possible to find out if the global footballing community can celebrate the ultimate rise of the sport in Africa.

Nigeria carries huge expectations on their shoulders every time they play. They are often regarded as the Brazil of Africa - playing the most sublime soccer on the continent and exporting some of the world's best footballers. It is also these qualities that raise expectations unrealistically high and the team often shows the strain of having to deal with that burden in various tournament. Too often they have flattered to deceive in previous World Cup finals and African Cup of Nations - the equivalent of the World Cup but played exclusively amongst the continent's countries. The Super Eagles are also often torn apart by internal disputes over money, disciplinary issues and an ever changing management that has disrupted many a preparation. Fans are not hoping for much this time and compared to previous squads, the Nigeria of 2010 do not quite spark everyone's imagination.

Algeria has made two previous trips to the World Cup finals and have overall made a positive impression. Known for mixing clever play with gutsy determination, the Algerians are your typical underdogs that can spring an upset when least expected, while stumbling when expectations are raised. It was again evident on their path to South Africa 2010 when they actually dumped African champions Egypt out of the qualifiers in stunning fashion. Yet, they failed horribly in the recent African Cup of Nations finals and have already been written off by most critics.

Ever since Sepp Blatter announced his desire to bring the World Cup finals to Africa, the FIFA President has also, on numerous occasions, stated his belief that an African nation has the ability to become world champions in football one day. Blatter has since realised his dream to stage the finals in an African country (South Africa 2010), but before then, there has been no representative from the continent in the final of previous editions.

There has been no shortage of contenders. For example, Nigeria has often been considered the strongest team in African football. However, they have yet to go as far as the final in any past World Cups. Ghana and Ivory Coast are also touted as countries that will challenge the established order in world football, yet the proof is in the pudding and they have not proven anything so far.

So will there ever be a World Cup winner that is part of the African continent? We can only look as far as the next World Cup finals and assess each of the contenders that have qualified for the chance. From there, it might perhaps be possible to find out if the global footballing community can celebrate the ultimate rise of the sport in Africa.

Nigeria carries huge expectations on their shoulders every time they play. They are often regarded as the Brazil of Africa - playing the most sublime soccer on the continent and exporting some of the world's best footballers. It is also these qualities that raise expectations unrealistically high and the team often shows the strain of having to deal with that burden in various tournament. Too often they have flattered to deceive in previous World Cup finals and African Cup of Nations - the equivalent of the World Cup but played exclusively amongst the continent's countries. The Super Eagles are also often torn apart by internal disputes over money, disciplinary issues and an ever changing management that has disrupted many a preparation. Fans are not hoping for much this time and compared to previous squads, the Nigeria of 2010 do not quite spark everyone's imagination.

Algeria has made two previous trips to the World Cup finals and have overall made a positive impression. Known for mixing clever play with gutsy determination, the Algerians are your typical underdogs that can spring an upset when least expected, while stumbling when expectations are raised. It was again evident on their path to South Africa 2010 when they actually dumped African champions Egypt out of the qualifiers in stunning fashion. Yet, they failed horribly in the recent African Cup of Nations finals and have already been written off by most critics.



Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4184000

Ever since Sepp Blatter announced his desire to bring the World Cup finals to Africa, the FIFA President has also, on numerous occasions, stated his belief that an African nation has the ability to become world champions in football one day. Blatter has since realised his dream to stage the finals in an African country (South Africa 2010), but before then, there has been no representative from the continent in the final of previous editions.

There has been no shortage of contenders. For example, Nigeria has often been considered the strongest team in African football. However, they have yet to go as far as the final in any past World Cups. Ghana and Ivory Coast are also touted as countries that will challenge the established order in world football, yet the proof is in the pudding and they have not proven anything so far.

So will there ever be a World Cup winner that is part of the African continent? We can only look as far as the next World Cup finals and assess each of the contenders that have qualified for the chance. From there, it might perhaps be possible to find out if the global footballing community can celebrate the ultimate rise of the sport in Africa.

Nigeria carries huge expectations on their shoulders every time they play. They are often regarded as the Brazil of Africa - playing the most sublime soccer on the continent and exporting some of the world's best footballers. It is also these qualities that raise expectations unrealistically high and the team often shows the strain of having to deal with that burden in various tournament. Too often they have flattered to deceive in previous World Cup finals and African Cup of Nations - the equivalent of the World Cup but played exclusively amongst the continent's countries. The Super Eagles are also often torn apart by internal disputes over money, disciplinary issues and an ever changing management that has disrupted many a preparation. Fans are not hoping for much this time and compared to previous squads, the Nigeria of 2010 do not quite spark everyone's imagination.

Algeria has made two previous trips to the World Cup finals and have overall made a positive impression. Known for mixing clever play with gutsy determination, the Algerians are your typical underdogs that can spring an upset when least expected, while stumbling when expectations are raised. It was again evident on their path to South Africa 2010 when they actually dumped African champions Egypt out of the qualifiers in stunning fashion. Yet, they failed horribly in the recent African Cup of Nations finals and have already been written off by most critics.

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