Ken Buchanan - Lightweight Champion of the World

Author : jihnymesaay
Publish Date : 2021-04-20 10:08:53
Ken Buchanan - Lightweight Champion of the World

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

Ken Buchanan was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 June 1945, to parents Tommy and Cathie. Both of whom were very supportive of their son's sporting ambitions throughout his early life. However, it was Ken's aunt, Joan and Agnes, who initially encouraged the youngster's enthusiasm for boxing. In 1952. the pair were shopping for Christmas presents for Ken and his cousin, Robert Barr, when they saw a pair of boxing gloves and it occurred to them that the two boys often enjoyed some playful sparring together. So, at the age of seven, the young Buchanan received his first pair of boxing gloves. 

It was another casual act, this time by father Tommy that sparked young Ken's interest in competitive boxing. One Saturday, when the family had finished shopping, Tommy took his son to the cinema to see The Joe Louis Story and Ken decided he'd like to join a boxing club. Tommy agreed. and the eight-year-old joined one of Scotland's best clubs. the Sparta. Two nights a week, alongside 50 other youths, young Ken learned how to box and before long he had won his first medal - with a three-round points win in the boys' 49lb (three stone seven pound) division. 

When he was 17, Buchanan won his first senior title, taking the East District bantamweight championship. Soon after that he reached the final of the Scottish Championships, but was outpointed. This earned him an international debut, where he scored a win against Switzerland, and a trip to the European championships in Russia, where an East German beat him in his first contest. The following year in 1965 Buchanan won the Scottish and ABA titles, and again he went to the European championships, where skeptics felt that politics had something to do with his controversial defeat by the reigning European and Olympic champion Stanislav Stepashkin of the USSR.

By now, it was time for the 20-year-old featherweight to think about those offers that had been coming in for him to turn professional . Eddie Thomas, who lived in Merthyr, Wales finally secured his signature for £500, even though other managers had offered more and most people expected Edinburgh's ex-British featherweight champ, Bobby Neill. To get the job, however, Thomas was already training British, European and future world feather champ Howard Winstone, and he clinched it by agreeing that Buchanan could continue to live in Edinburgh.

He started boxing professionally on September 20, 1965, beating Brian Tonks by a knockout in two rounds in London. He spent much of the early parts of his career fighting undistinguished opponents in England. His Scottish debut came in his 17th fight, when he outpointed John McMillan over 10 rounds on January 23, 1967. Prior to that, he had also beaten Ivan Whiter by a decision in 8 rounds.

Thomas curbed Buchanan's willingness to mix it in his contests, emphasizing the benefits of defensive techniques and ringcraft. In Thomas's opinion, the less punishment a fighter took, the longer his career lasted. However, right from the beginning, the Scot's relationship with his manager was very uneasy.

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