How to Pack For an Around-The-World Trip

Author : jihnymesaay
Publish Date : 2021-04-20 09:33:10
How to Pack For an Around-The-World Trip

A 7000-cubic-inch suitcase stuffed, fully loaded, with over sixty pounds of supplies; tent, sleeping bag, stove, frying pan, eight changes of clothes, coffee pot, and God only knows what else. That was how I took my first solo trip abroad. By the time my trip was over six weeks later I had sold, lost, thrown away or cursed carrying three quarters of the stuff I'd packed. So please, learn from my mistake. IF YOU DON'T NEED IT, LEAVE IT. That's the only rule for packing for a trip abroad, which believe it or not can be the most important part of the trip.

If you don't need it, leave it. I can't say it enough.

You can almost always tell the seasoned traveler from the new kid on the block simply by the size of their pack. The pack I use now is a small, 2100-cubic-inch backpack. It works perfect as a carry on everywhere I go. Sometimes, it is a real treat to see the professional traveler, someone who has been on the trail for years. These travelers usually have a bag smaller then a lot of purses, with some extra underwear, a toothbrush and a good book. When you think about it, what more do you really need?

My basic philosophy about what to bring on an around-the-world trip stems for the type of trip I like to take, with a comfort level allowing me to buy almost anything I need on the road. When I'm on the road the last thing I want to do is worry about my stuff. I have been on countless buses where bags are coming off at an interim stop and have watched as travelers dutifully study each bag that comes off to make sure it isn't theirs. I've also been walking with people who won't walk down a very interesting but darkened road because they're carrying an $800.00 camera. I've watched this type of person as they are approached by local towts. They inevitably grab their camera tight, or unconsciously check their money belt.

I make sure I don't have any stuff on me that's worth worrying too much about, and walk with the philosophy that if someone robs me, I simply say OK, here you go, and hand it over. People are people all over the world. A thug in the Third World can read body language just as well, if not better, than a thug in the U.S. I have never been robbed while traveling and I'm truly convinced it's because of my diligence, but even more so due to my maintaining an attitude that if necessary I really don't care if my stuff disappears.

If you can adopt this approach you will walk differently. Your body language will say, "Hey, I'm not worth the hassle, try someone else." Since adopting this approach I find I have a greater opportunity to enjoy the local flavor and spend more time observing and participating and less time worrying about my stuff.

A 7000-cubic-inch suitcase stuffed, fully loaded, with over sixty pounds of supplies; tent, sleeping bag, stove, frying pan, eight changes of clothes, coffee pot, and God only knows what else. That was how I took my first solo trip abroad. By the time my trip was over six weeks later I had sold, lost, thrown away or cursed carrying three quarters of the stuff I'd packed. So please, learn from my mistake. IF YOU DON'T NEED IT, LEAVE IT. That's the only rule for packing for a trip abroad, which believe it or not can be the most important part of the trip.

If you don't need it, leave it. I can't say it enough.

You can almost always tell the seasoned traveler from the new kid on the block simply by the size of their pack. The pack I use now is a small, 2100-cubic-inch backpack. It works perfect as a carry on everywhere I go. Sometimes, it is a real treat to see the professional traveler, someone who has been on the trail for years. These travelers usually have a bag smaller then a lot of purses, with some extra underwear, a toothbrush and a good book. When you think about it, what more do you really need?

My basic philosophy about what to bring on an around-the-world trip stems for the type of trip I like to take, with a comfort level allowing me to buy almost anything I need on the road. When I'm on the road the last thing I want to do is worry about my stuff. I have been on countless buses where bags are coming off at an interim stop and have watched as travelers dutifully study each bag that comes off to make sure it isn't theirs. I've also been walking with people who won't walk down a very interesting but darkened road because they're carrying an $800.00 camera. I've watched this type of person as they are approached by local towts. They inevitably grab their camera tight, or unconsciously check their money belt.

I make sure I don't have any stuff on me that's worth worrying too much about, and walk with the philosophy that if someone robs me, I simply say OK, here you go, and hand it over. People are people all over the world. A thug in the Third World can read body language just as well, if not better, than a thug in the U.S. I have never been robbed while traveling and I'm truly convinced it's because of my diligence, but even more so due to my maintaining an attitude that if necessary I really don't care if my stuff disappears.

If you can adopt this approach you will walk differently. Your body language will say, "Hey, I'm not worth the hassle, try someone else." Since adopting this approach I find I have a greater opportunity to enjoy the local flavor and spend more time observing and participating and less time worrying about my stuff.

A 7000-cubic-inch suitcase stuffed, fully loaded, with over sixty pounds of supplies; tent, sleeping bag, stove, frying pan, eight changes of clothes, coffee pot, and God only knows what else. That was how I took my first solo trip abroad. By the time my trip was over six weeks later I had sold, lost, thrown away or cursed carrying three quarters of the stuff I'd packed. So please, learn from my mistake. IF YOU DON'T NEED IT, LEAVE IT. That's the only rule for packing for a trip abroad, which believe it or not can be the most important part of the trip.

If you don't need it, leave it. I can't say it enough.

You can almost always tell the seasoned traveler from the new kid on the block simply by the size of their pack. The pack I use now is a small, 2100-cubic-inch backpack. It works perfect as a carry on everywhere I go. Sometimes, it is a real treat to see the professional traveler, someone who has been on the trail for years. These travelers usually have a bag smaller then a lot of purses, with some extra underwear, a toothbrush and a good book. When you think about it, what more do you really need?

My basic philosophy about what to bring on an around-the-world trip stems for the type of trip I like to take, with a comfort level allowing me to buy almost anything I need on the road. When I'm on the road the last thing I want to do is worry about my stuff. I have been on countless buses where bags are coming off at an interim stop and have watched as travelers dutifully study each bag that comes off to make sure it isn't theirs. I've also been walking with people who won't walk down a very interesting but darkened road because they're carrying an $800.00 camera. I've watched this type of person as they are approached by local towts. They inevitably grab their camera tight, or unconsciously check their money belt.

I make sure I don't have any stuff on me that's worth worrying too much about, and walk with the philosophy that if someone robs me, I simply say OK, here you go, and hand it over. People are people all over the world. A thug in the Third World can read body language just as well, if not better, than a thug in the U.S. I have never been robbed while traveling and I'm truly convinced it's because of my diligence, but even more so due to my maintaining an attitude that if necessary I really don't care if my stuff disappears.

If you can adopt this approach you will walk differently. Your body language will say, "Hey, I'm not worth the hassle, try someone else." Since adopting this approach I find I have a greater opportunity to enjoy the local flavor and spend more time observing and participating and less time worrying about my stuff.

A 7000-cubic-inch suitcase stuffed, fully loaded, with over sixty pounds of supplies; tent, sleeping bag, stove, frying pan, eight changes of clothes, coffee pot, and God only knows what else. That was how I took my first solo trip abroad. By the time my trip was over six weeks later I had sold, lost, thrown away or cursed carrying three quarters of the stuff I'd packed. So please, learn from my mistake. IF YOU DON'T NEED IT, LEAVE IT. That's the only rule for packing for a trip abroad, which believe it or not can be the most important part of the trip.

If you don't need it, leave it. I can't say it enough.

You can almost always tell the seasoned traveler from the new kid on the block simply by the size of their pack. The pack I use now is a small, 2100-cubic-inch backpack. It works perfect as a carry on everywhere I go. Sometimes, it is a real treat to see the professional traveler, someone who has been on the trail for years. These travelers usually have a bag smaller then a lot of purses, with some extra underwear, a toothbrush and a good book. When you think about it, what more do you really need?

My basic philosophy about what to bring on an around-the-world trip stems for the type of trip I like to take, with a comfort level allowing me to buy almost anything I need on the road. When I'm on the road the last thing I want to do is worry about my stuff. I have been on countless buses where bags are coming off at an interim stop and have watched as travelers dutifully study each bag that comes off to make sure it isn't theirs. I've also been walking with people who won't walk down a very interesting but darkened road because they're carrying an $800.00 camera. I've watched this type of person as they are approached by local towts. They inevitably grab their camera tight, or unconsciously check their money belt.

I make sure I don't have any stuff on me that's worth worrying too much about, and walk with the philosophy that if someone robs me, I simply say OK, here you go, and hand it over. People are people all over the world. A thug in the Third World can read body language just as well, if not better, than a thug in the U.S. I have never been robbed while traveling and I'm truly convinced it's because of my diligence, but even more so due to my maintaining an attitude that if necessary I really don't care if my stuff disappears.

If you can adopt this approach you will walk differently. Your body language will say, "Hey, I'm not worth the hassle, try someone else." Since adopting this approach I find I have a greater opportunity to enjoy the local flavor and spend more time observing and participating and less time worrying about my stuff.

A 7000-cubic-inch suitcase stuffed, fully loaded, with over sixty pounds of supplies; tent, sleeping bag, stove, frying pan, eight changes of clothes, coffee pot, and God only knows what else. That was how I took my first solo trip abroad. By the time my trip was over six weeks later I had sold, lost, thrown away or cursed carrying three quarters of the stuff I'd packed. So please, learn from my mistake. IF YOU DON'T NEED IT, LEAVE IT. That's the only rule for packing for a trip abroad, which believe it or not can be the most important part of the trip.

If you don't need it, leave it. I can't say it enough.

You can almost always tell the seasoned traveler from the new kid on the block simply by the size of their pack. The pack I use now is a small, 2100-cubic-inch backpack. It works perfect as a carry on everywhere I go. Sometimes, it is a real treat to see the professional traveler, someone who has been on the trail for years. These travelers usually have a bag smaller then a lot of purses, with some extra underwear, a toothbrush and a good book. When you think about it, what more do you really need?

My basic philosophy about what to bring on an around-the-world trip stems for the type of trip I like to take, with a comfort level allowing me to buy almost anything I need on the road. When I'm on the road the last thing I want to do is worry about my stuff. I have been on countless buses where bags are coming off at an interim stop and have watched as travelers dutifully study each bag that comes off to make sure it isn't theirs. I've also been walking with people who won't walk down a very interesting but darkened road because they're carrying an $800.00 camera. I've watched this type of person as they are approached by local towts. They inevitably grab their camera tight, or unconsciously check their money belt.

I make sure I don't have any stuff on me that's worth worrying too much about, and walk with the philosophy that if someone robs me, I simply say OK, here you go, and hand it over. People are people all over the world. A thug in the Third World can read body language just as well, if not better, than a thug in the U.S. I have never been robbed while traveling and I'm truly convinced it's because of my diligence, but even more so due to my maintaining an attitude that if necessary I really don't care if my stuff disappears.

If you can adopt this approach you will walk differently. Your body language will say, "Hey, I'm not worth the hassle, try someone else." Since adopting this approach I find I have a greater opportunity to enjoy the local flavor and spend more time observing and participating and less time worrying about my stuff.

A 7000-cubic-inch suitcase stuffed, fully loaded, with over sixty pounds of supplies; tent, sleeping bag, stove, frying pan, eight changes of clothes, coffee pot, and God only knows what else. That was how I took my first solo trip abroad. By the time my trip was over six weeks later I had sold, lost, thrown away or cursed carrying three quarters of the stuff I'd packed. So please, learn from my mistake. IF YOU DON'T NEED IT, LEAVE IT. That's the only rule for packing for a trip abroad, which believe it or not can be the most important part of the trip.

If you don't need it, leave it. I can't say it enough.

You can almost always tell the seasoned traveler from the new kid on the block simply by the size of their pack. The pack I use now is a small, 2100-cubic-inch backpack. It works perfect as a carry on everywhere I go. Sometimes, it is a real treat to see the professional traveler, someone who has been on the trail for years. These travelers usually have a bag smaller then a lot of purses, with some extra underwear, a toothbrush and a good book. When you think about it, what more do you really need?

My basic philosophy about what to bring on an around-the-world trip stems for the type of trip I like to take, with a comfort level allowing me to buy almost anything I need on the road. When I'm on the road the last thing I want to do is worry about my stuff. I have been on countless buses where bags are coming off at an interim stop and have watched as travelers dutifully study each bag that comes off to make sure it isn't theirs. I've also been walking with people who won't walk down a very interesting but darkened road because they're carrying an $800.00 camera. I've watched this type of person as they are approached by local towts. They inevitably grab their camera tight, or unconsciously check their money belt.

I make sure I don't have any stuff on me that's worth worrying too much about, and walk with the philosophy that if someone robs me, I simply say OK, here you go, and hand it over. People are people all over the world. A thug in the Third World can read body language just as well, if not better, than a thug in the U.S. I have never been robbed while traveling and I'm truly convinced it's because of my diligence, but even more so due to my maintaining an attitude that if necessary I really don't care if my stuff disappears.

If you can adopt this approach you will walk differently. Your body language will say, "Hey, I'm not worth the hassle, try someone else." Since adopting this approach I find I have a greater opportunity to enjoy the local flavor and spend more time observing and participating and less time worrying about my stuff.

A 7000-cubic-inch suitcase stuffed, fully loaded, with over sixty pounds of supplies; tent, sleeping bag, stove, frying pan, eight changes of clothes, coffee pot, and God only knows what else. That was how I took my first solo trip abroad. By the time my trip was over six weeks later I had sold, lost, thrown away or cursed carrying three quarters of the stuff I'd packed. So please, learn from my mistake. IF YOU DON'T NEED IT, LEAVE IT. That's the only rule for packing for a trip abroad, which believe it or not can be the most important part of the trip.

If you don't need it, leave it. I can't say it enough.

You can almost always tell the seasoned traveler from the new kid on the block simply by the size of their pack. The pack I use now is a small, 2100-cubic-inch backpack. It works perfect as a carry on everywhere I go. Sometimes, it is a real treat to see the professional traveler, someone who has been on the trail for years. These travelers usually have a bag smaller then a lot of purses, with some extra underwear, a toothbrush and a good book. When you think about it, what more do you really need?

My basic philosophy about what to bring on an around-the-world trip stems for the type of trip I like to take, with a comfort level allowing me to buy almost anything I need on the road. When I'm on the road the last thing I want to do is worry about my stuff. I have been on countless buses where bags are coming off at an interim stop and have watched as travelers dutifully study each bag that comes off to make sure it isn't theirs. I've also been walking with people who won't walk down a very interesting but darkened road because they're carrying an $800.00 camera. I've watched this type of person as they are approached by local towts. They inevitably grab their camera tight, or unconsciously check their money belt.

I make sure I don't have any stuff on me that's worth worrying too much about, and walk with the philosophy that if someone robs me, I simply say OK, here you go, and hand it over. People are people all over the world. A thug in the Third World can read body language just as well, if not better, than a thug in the U.S. I have never been robbed while traveling and I'm truly convinced it's because of my diligence, but even more so due to my maintaining an attitude that if necessary I really don't care if my stuff disappears.

If you can adopt this approach you will walk differently. Your body language will say, "Hey, I'm not worth the hassle, try someone else." Since adopting this approach I find I have a greater opportunity to enjoy the local flavor and spend more time observing and participating and less time worrying about my stuff.

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