SCS providing emotional support for students in response to Derek Chauvin trial

Author : LavadaCrooks
Publish Date : 2021-04-21 05:35:34
SCS providing emotional support for students in response to Derek Chauvin trial

© Provided by WMC Action News 5 Memphis

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (WMC) - The national attention surrounding the trial of Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer convicted in the death of George Floyd, has called Shelby County Schools to create a means to offer emotional support to students.

SCS says it put together a Social Emotional Learning Team that has gathered resources to help teachers and school staff have supportive conversations with students who may want to express their feelings or ask questions.

“One of the most important things we can do as adults is to be aware of our own emotions when dealing with a difficult conversation before responding. Additionally, we can always do our best to offer kindness and compassion to our colleagues, students and families with whom we work,” the district wrote in a newsletter sent before the verdict was announced.

Listed below are suggestions and resources provided by SCS that would be helpful to students during this time:

Tips for what to do:

  • Remain open to conversations and navigate with empathy and care. Your main job is to listen.
  • Honor each student’s unique experience and story that they share.
  • Refrain from asking too many questions.
  • Keep in mind the developmental age of the students as you process.
  • Reach out to support staff (counselors/social workers) in your building if you recognize that particular students need additional individual support.
  • Take three slow breaths/stretch tall/listen to soothing music for a few minutes to help calm your nervous system before getting on video or responding to a student.
  • Remember not to offer false reassurance or be dismissive: “Everything will be OK.” - “I know how you feel.”
  • Remember that sometimes silence is better than offering any words of support.
  • Tips for what to say:
  • Emphasize with each child that we see them, hear them, value them, and love them.
  • There is never a ‘right’ way for a child or adult to feel. Acknowledge that each person responds to events or trauma in different ways. Recognize the personal nature of any traumatic event and, in particular, this event.
  • Do not be afraid to admit that you cannot answer all of their questions: “This is difficult, and I don’t know what to say right now.”
  • Pause and listen: “There’s a© Provided by WMC Action News 5 Memphis

    MEMPHIS, Tenn. (WMC) - The national attention surrounding the trial of Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer convicted in the death of George Floyd, has called Shelby County Schools to create a means to offer emotional support to students.

    SCS says it put together a Social Emotional Learning Team that has gathered resources to help teachers and school staff have supportive conversations with students who may want to express their feelings or ask questions.

    “One of the most important things we can do as adults is to be aware of our own emotions when dealing with a difficult conversation before responding. Additionally, we can always do our best to offer kindness and compassion to our colleagues, students and families with whom we work,” the district wrote in a newsletter sent before the verdict was announced.

    Listed below are suggestions and resources provided by SCS that would be helpful to students during this time:

    Tips for what to do:
  • Remain open to conversations and navigate with empathy and care. Your main job is to listen.
  • Honor each student’s unique experience and story that they share.
  • Refrain from asking too many questions.
  • Keep in mind the developmental age of the students as you process.
  • Reach out to support staff (counselors/social workers) in your building if you recognize that particular students need additional individual support.
  • Take three slow breaths/stretch tall/listen to soothing music for a few minutes to help calm your nervous system before getting on video or responding to a student.
  • Remember not to offer false reassurance or be dismissive: “Everything will be OK.” - “I know how you feel.”
  • Remember that sometimes silence is better than offering any words of support.
  • Tips for what to say:
  • Emphasize with each child that we see them, hear them, value them, and love them.
  • There is never a ‘right’ way for a child or adult to feel. Acknowledge that each person responds to events or trauma in different ways. Recognize the personal nature of any traumatic event and, in particular, this event.
  • Do not be afraid to admit that you cannot answer all of their questions: “This is difficult, and I don’t know what to say right now.”
  • Pause and listen: “There’s a lot going on. How are you doing?”
  • Offer an email address or work phone if you have one. Do not share personal phone numbers. “This is how you can reach me. I’m available at _________________.”
  • Reassure students that you are here to listen and support.
  • You can model what you do when you’re feeling emotions (worry, anger, or anxiety) if a student communicates a strong emotion. “When I’m worried, I try _______________. If that doesn’t work, I try _________________. Is there anything that’s worked for you in the past to help calm?”
  • Resources for talking to students: Resources for cultural responsiveness & racial healing Copyright 2021 WMC. All rights reserved.
  • lot going on. How are you doing?”
  • Offer an email address or work phone if you have one. Do not share personal phone numbers. “This is how you can reach me. I’m available at _________________.”
  • Reassure students that you are here to listen and support.
  • You can model what you do when you’re feeling emotions (worry, anger, or anxiety) if a student communicates a strong emotion. “When I’m worried, I try _______________. If that doesn’t work, I try _________________. Is ther© Provided by WMC Action News 5 Memphis

    MEMPHIS, Tenn. (WMC) - The national attention surrounding the trial of Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer convicted in the death of George Floyd, has called Shelby County Schools to create a means to offer emotional support to students.

    SCS says it put together a Social Emotional Learning Team that has gathered resources to help teachers and school staff have supportive conversations with students who may want to express their feelings or ask questions.

    “One of the most important things we can do as adults is to be aware of our own emotions when dealing with a difficult conversation before responding. Additionally, we can always do our best to offer kindness and compassion to our colleagues, students and families with whom we work,” the district wrote in a newsletter sent before the verdict was announced.

    Listed below are suggestions and resources provided by SCS that would be helpful to students during this time:

    Tips for what to do:
  • Remain open to conversations and navigate with empathy and care. Your main job is to listen.
  • Honor each student’s unique experience and story that they share.
  • Refrain from asking too many questions.
  • Keep in mind the developmental age of the students as you process.
  • Reach out to support staff (counselors/social workers) in your building if you recognize that particular students need additional individual support.
  • Take three slow breaths/stretch tall/listen to soothing music for a few minutes to help calm your nervous system before getting on video or responding to a student.
  • Remember not to offer false reassurance or be dismissive: “Everything will be OK.” - “I know how you feel.”
  • Remember that sometimes silence is better than offering any words of support.
  • Tips for what to say:
  • Emphasize with each child that we see them, hear them, value them, and love them.
  • There is never a ‘right’ way for a child or adult to feel. Acknowledge that each person responds to events or trauma in different ways. Recognize the personal nature of any traumatic event and, in particular, this event.
  • Do not be afraid to admit that you cannot answer all of their questions: “This is difficult, and I don’t know what to say right now.”
  • Pause and listen: “There’s a lot going on. How are you doing?”
  • Offer an email address or work phone if you have one. Do not share personal phone numbers. “This is how you can reach me. I’m available at _________________.”© Provided by WMC Action News 5 Memphis

    MEMPHIS, Tenn. (WMC) - The national attention surrounding the trial of Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer convicted in the death of George Floyd, has called Shelby County Schools to create a means to offer emotional support to students.

    SCS says it put together a Social Emotional Learning Team that has gathered resources to help teachers and school staff have supportive conversations with students who may want to express their feelings or ask questions.

    “One of the most important things we can do as adults is to be aware of our own emotions when dealing with a difficult conversation before responding. Additionally, we can always do our best to offer kindness and compassion to our colleagues, students and families with whom we work,” the district wrote in a newsletter sent before the verdict was announced.

    Listed below are suggestions and resources provided by SCS that would be helpful to students during this time:

    Tips for what to do:
  • Remain open to conversations and navigate with empathy and care. Your main job is to listen.
  • Honor each student’s unique experience and story that they share.
  • Refrain from asking too many questions.
  • Keep in mind the developmental age of the students as you process.
  • Reach out to support staff (counselors/social workers) in your building if you recognize that particular students need additional individual support.
  • Take three slow breaths/stretch tall/listen to soothing music for a few minutes to help calm your nervous system before getting on video or responding to a student.
  • Remember not to offer false reassurance or be dismissive: “Everything will be OK.” - “I know how you feel.”
  • Remember that sometimes silence is better than offering any words of support.
  • Tips for what to say:
  • Emphasize with each child that we see them, hear them, value them, and love them.
  • There is never a ‘right’ way for a child or adult to feel. Acknowledge that each person responds to events or trauma in different ways. Recognize the personal nature of any traumatic event and, in particular, this event.
  • Do not be afraid to admit that you cannot answer all of their questions: “This is difficult, and I don’t know what to say right now.”
  • Pause and listen: “There’s a lot going on. How are you doing?”
  • Offer an email address or work phone if you have one. Do not share personal phone numbers. “This is how you can reach me. I’m available at _________________.”
    https://iway.rosemont.edu/ICS/Campus_Life/Campus_Groups/Organization_of_African_American_Students/Home.jnz?portlet=Discussion_Board&screen=PostView&screenType=change&id=75c1e256-f243-42a4-961d-893f5d6451b3
    https://iway.rosemont.edu/ICS/Campus_Life/Campus_Groups/Organization_of_African_American_Students/Home.jnz?portlet=Discussion_Board&screen=PostView&screenType=change&id=7a6c5830-ae8c-4198-91a2-e578f0f7fb78
    https://iway.rosemont.edu/ICS/Campus_Life/Campus_Groups/Organization_of_African_American_Students/Home.jnz?portlet=Discussion_Board&screen=PostView&screenType=change&id=91d72b70-f104-4291-a64f-4b1bfea47b6d
    https://iway.rosemont.edu/ICS/Campus_Life/Campus_Groups/Organization_of_African_American_Students/Home.jnz?portlet=Discussion_Board&screen=PostView&screenType=change&id=4a2a2305-2df7-4ec8-8d5b-875e12b64116
    https://iway.rosemont.edu/ICS/Campus_Life/Campus_Groups/Organization_of_African_American_Students/Home.jnz?portlet=Discussion_Board&screen=PostView&screenType=change&id=3a301ecb-36ad-4105-962b-adc1abcdabf0
  • Reassure students that you are here to listen and support.
  • You can model what you do when you’re feeling emotions (worry, anger, or anxiety) if a student communicates a strong emotion. “When I’m worried, I try _______________. If that doesn’t work, I try _________________. Is there anything that’s worked for you in the past to help calm?”
  • Resources for talking to students: Resources for cultural responsiveness & racial healing Copyright 2021 WMC. All rights reserved.
  • Reassure students that you are here to listen and support.
  • You can model what you do when you’re feeling emotions (worry, anger, or anxiety) if a student communicates a strong emotion. “When I’m worried, I try _______________. If that doesn’t work, I try _________________. Is there anything that’s worked for you in the past to help calm?”
  • Resources for talking to students: Resources for cultural responsiveness & racial healing Copyright 2021 WMC. All rights reserved.
  • e anything that’s worked for you in the past to help calm?”
  • Resources for talking to students: Resources for cultural responsiveness & racial healing Copyright 2021 WMC. All rights reserved.



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